ATNI Postion Announcement: Project Coordinator

Position Description

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders-Team Akiak

Project Coordinator (Part-time contract)

TITLE: PROJECT COORDINATOR (Contract Position)

HOURS: Up to 20 hours per week

LOCATION: Remote within the Greater Northwest and Western Alaska

PAY RANGE: $28-30 per hour (No benefits included)

SUBMISSION DATE: Wednesday, March 24, 2021 at 5 PM (PT)

Job Description:  PROJECT COORDINATOR

This position is open to interested contractors.  Serious part-time applicants please send a cover letter, resume/CV and three references (name, title, organization, email, phone) to James Parker of ATNI at jparker@atnitribes.org by March 24, 2021 at 5 PM (PST).   This is in conjunction with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Project Overview

This study builds on an established community partnership between our interdisciplinary team and an Alaskan Native community.  This study embodies Indigenous research methodologies including ethical tribal engagement at all stages of research design, implementation, dissemination and policy impact.  Our work will yield two broad results: water quality data on local watersheds and a better understanding about how environmentally related stress experienced by the Alaska Native community is impacting their health.  In addition,we will initiate extensive conversations around the topics of water and health by building a network of tribal leaders and policy makers to prioritize their local needs and to identify culturally grounded solutions.

Who are we? 

This study is a community-academic partnership endeavor between ATNI, University of Washington and an Alaska Native community. Through this partnership ATNI has an outstanding opportunity for a Project Coordinator reporting to the Project Director for the environmental research project, “A Holistic Environmental Health Approach to Promoting Health, Equity and Water Security in one Alaska Native Village.”

Position Purpose

The primary purpose of this Project Coordinator position is to provide research project coordination and support for a research team across ATNI, University of Washington and an Alaska Native community to achieve the aims of the environmental health study. The Project Coordinator works under the general direction of the Project Director, and provides overall coordination. 

Under the guidance of the Project Director, the Project Coordinator will be responsible for day-to-day administration of the project. This will include, but is not limited to, scheduling virtual and in-person meetings, record keeping, assisting with coordinating data collection and arranging water quality data testing in labs among partnering institutions, assuring fidelity to data collection protocols, ordering supplies, and managing travel arrangements. Additionally, he/she/they will provide logistical support for quantitative and qualitative data collection in the Pacific Northwest and Alaskan sites. He/she/they will also generate progress reports to funders and Tribal partners, create posters and other communication tools, and coordinate dissemination of research results at the community-level, as well as support the research team in publication of research results. This position requires a high degree of flexibility and tact, the ability to work with a wide range of community and academic partners, and experience developing, implementing, and monitoring research protocols.

Position Dimensions

The part-time (up to 20 hours per week) position bridges the often wide gap – real and perceived – between academia and community, especially with respect to environment health research. By building mutual trusting relationships between academia and communities, both parties will be able to address environmental health disparities to the mutual benefit of community well-being, as well as academic research.

Duties and Responsibilities

Responsibilities for the study include but are not limited to:

  • Work with the Principal Investigators to design and implement the various phases of the research project.
  • Coordinate work plans to meet strategic objectives for continued partnership engagement, recruitment of participants, focus groups, water sample, online survey development, data collection, data analysis and dissemination.
  • Assess unique research approval mechanisms for the UW and the partnering tribes, identify diverse approval steps, and complete all necessary processes (including IRB applications, administrative letters, and tribal resolutions) to obtain research approval from partner tribes. 
  • Assist the team in establishing protocols to standardize daily operating procedures and promoting an organizational culture that is transparent and accountable to all stakeholders.
  • Organize, maintain and revise project files and the large number of documents within those files.

Requirements

Master’s degree in Information School, American Indian or Indigenous Studies, Environmental Science, Public Health, Psychology, Tribal Colleges and Universities or related field and 2-3 years of relevant experience to include:

  • At least 2 years of Community-Based Participatory Research education and/or experience
  • At least 2 years of work with American Indian/Alaskan Native communities 
  • Strong project management skills, including meeting scheduling, travel logistics and financial reconciliation
  • Knowledge and prior experience with human subjects institutional review process
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, Zoom, References and Bibliography software (e.g., Endnote)
  • Strong commitment to social justice and experience partnering with under-served communities for purposes of health equity 
  • Ability to work independently, prioritize and manage multiple tasks, and conduct follow-up
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills (written and spoken), with demonstrated ability to earn trust and respect of colleagues and partners at all levels and from diverse backgrounds and cultures
  • Flexibility with shifting priorities and competing demands 
  • Ability to work as a collaborative, cooperative, and congenial member of an interdisciplinary research team, as well as work independently.   

Desired

Experience in tracking, completing and revising research ethics and project recruitment materials in tribal settings.  

Start and End Dates

The position is open immediately, March 15, 2021, with funding guaranteed through Sep 1, 2023. 

2020-25 Resolution

Res #: Committee: Submitted by: Title:                                 Pass → Yes No Amended/Tabled To NCAI
2020-25 Natural Resources Taylor Aalvik Support Tribal And State Authority To Protect Water Quality And Restore Columbia River Basin Salmon X


https://atnitribes.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Res-2020-25-.pdf

2020-24 Resolution

Res #: Committee: Submitted by: Title:                                 Pass → Yes No Amended/Tabled To NCAI
2020-24 Natural Resources Taylor Aalvik Call Upon The State Of Oregon Department Of Environmental Quality to Establish a Review Committee to Evaluate the Actual and Real Impacts of Transloading Heavy Crude at Port Westward by the Columbia Pacific Bio-Refinery X


https://atnitribes.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Res-2020-24-.pdf

2020-23 Resolution

Res #: Committee: Submitted by: Title:                                 Pass → Yes No Amended/Tabled To NCAI
2020-23 Natural Resources Taylor Aalvik Support S. 3019 – Montana Water Rights Protection Act, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes’ Water Settlement Legislation X


https://atnitribes.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Res-2020-23-.pdf

2020-21 Resolution

Res #: Committee: Submitted by: Title:                                 Pass → Yes No Amended/Tabled To NCAI
2020-21 Natural Resources Taylor Aalvik Protecting NW Rivers & Streams X


https://atnitribes.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Res-2020-22-.pdf

“No-action alternative”; as the preferred alternative in the Tongass National Forest, Alaska Roadless Rulemaking process.

May 27, 2020
Sonny Perdue, Secretary of Agriculture
U.S. Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Avenue
SW Washington, DC 20250


Dear Honorable Secretary Perdue,


The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) requests the U.S. Forest Service to fully protect
designated roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest. ATNI stands in support and solidarity
with the Organized Village of Kake and several other Southeast Alaska Tribes, which have made it
very clear that any rule that weakens or eliminates Roadless Rule protections within Tribal
traditional territory of the Tongass National Forest will substantially affect Southeast Tribes’
inherent Tribal rights to traditional and customary uses of the land.
During ATNI’s Annual Convention on October 10, 2019, nearly 50 member Tribes from SE Alaska,
Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Northern California passed resolution #19-58, which
supported the ‘no-action alternative’ as the preferred alternative in the Tongass National
Forest, Alaska Roadless Rulemaking process.


On October 15, 2019, the United States Forest Service (USFS) released the Draft Tongass Rule
that proposed granting a complete exemption to the 2001 National Roadless Conservation Rule.
The USFS is advancing the Tongass Roadless final rule review even though a state of national
emergency has been declared in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Organized Village of
Kake and other Southeast Alaska Tribes have raised serious concerns about the USFS closing a
cooperator review input period for the draft final rule one week after the national emergency was
declared. This is an unconscionable act without any consideration of the good faith efforts of
Tribes trying to protect their customary and traditional lands. 


President Trump issued an executive order declaring a state of national emergency on March 13,
2020, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States.  Since then, numerous U.S.
governmental organizations, including the U.S. Supreme Court and the Internal Revenue Service,
have announced extensions of normal filing deadlines because of ongoing public health concerns
relating to COVID-19.  Additionally, Alaska Governor Dunleavy has instituted numerous restrictions
limiting the public’s ability to gather, work, and travel. Southeast Tribal communities are exhausting
all available resources to prepare and address this health crisis in their communities. All of these
restrictions make it extremely challenging, if not impossible, to engage in federal rulemaking.
Around March 7, 2020, the Forest Service sent Southeast Alaska Tribal cooperators a pre-public
draft, final environmental impact statement, and requested feedback by March 21, 2020. The
Forest Service did not suspend this process or extend this deadline even though a national
pandemic emergency had been declared in the interim. 


Southeast Tribes involved in Forest Service planning processes, like most communities, are
entirely focused on the COVID-19 crisis and are unable to devote the time and attention to
participate meaningfully during this declared national emergency health crisis.  Tribes and Tribal
leaders are working hard to keep their respective communities and families healthy and safe while
complying with the extraordinary restrictions being implemented to contain and limit the spread of
the disease.  COVID-19 has disrupted normal working, schooling, and living conditions, impairing
the ability of many parents, elders, and members of the general public to go about their daily
routines and conduct regular business, much less weigh in on Forest Service actions.  


In-person meetings that are essential for high-quality Tribal participation and consultation in
planning processes cannot take place, as Tribes must maintain the recommended or mandated
health standards and “social distancing” required to protect vulnerable populations. Virtual
meetings and other online tools cannot meet the requirements of a robust discussion that would
inform a Tribal position on draft documents. Many Tribal communities do not have the technology,
internet resources, or bandwidth necessary to enable participation in virtual meetings or to review
of large documents. This problem is compounded by the closures of Forest Service offices and
local libraries, preventing access to online or hard copies of planning documents.  Any existing
digital platforms and networks, especially in remote, rural areas, are being overwhelmed with
increased demands at this time, which will further impede connection and participation.  
The fact is the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to create significant challenges for Southeast
Alaska Tribal communities and all of Indian Country. Until Tribes can fully participate, ATNI
requests that USDA/USFS suspend the roadless review process and retroactively suspend the
cooperator review timeframe, until the national emergencies concluded.  


After the national emergency has been lifted, Southeast Alaska Tribes will be able to meaningfully
fulfill their role as cooperators and provide a comprehensive review of the pre-public rule
documents at that time.  Such action would be consistent with the President’s emergency
declaration to improve public engagement and build goodwill with many stakeholders during these
unprecedented and challenging times.


Sincerely, 

Terri Parr
Executive Director

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians and Northwest tribal leaders stand together to protect the environment


Northwest tribes call on federal government to respect tribal opposition to controversial environmental decisions that impact traditional lands

News Release

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians

On January 30, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) concluded their successful Winter Convention.

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians’ Winter Convention is one of the largest Pacific Northwest regional convening of tribal leaders from across Oregon, Idaho, Washington, southeast Alaska, Northern California and Montana. Tribal leaders engage in policy and legislative discussions, share emerging trends on critical issues facing tribal communities, and work collaboratively on committees to develop positions on policy, legislation, and help frame the future of Indian Country in the Northwest. 

A wide array of pressing issues were discussed this Convention ranging from the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women epidemic to fighting climate change but a clear theme emerged: the United States Government needs to respect and hear tribal voices that are working so hard to protect their people and their traditional lands and waters. 

With the Trump administration’s recent rollback of protections to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), tribal leaders are increasingly concerned and, therefore, unanimously passed a resolution calling on the Council on Environmental Quality to consult with tribes on the regulatory proposal to change important regulations under the Environmental Policy Act. 

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) has become a leading voice for environmental protection for Indian Country nationwide and is a strong voice in support of Alaska tribes that are fighting efforts to remove environmental protections in Alaska, especially in areas like Bristol Bay whose waters and salmon are an integral part of Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians members’ traditional ways of life. 

“We are so thankful that the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians are standing with the people of Bristol Bay as fellow salmon people. We are doing everything we can to protect our people’s way of life,” said Alannah Hurley (Yup’ik), United Tribes of Bristol Bay. “The fact that Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians and other nations across the U.S. are standing with us, makes a very big difference. This is a really big year for us. The Corps is talking about getting a permit decision out in 2020, so our unity and cooperation is paramount in the work we are doing.” 

At the convention, Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians members also reiterated their support for the Alaska tribes fighting U.S. Government efforts to remove protections for 9.5 million acres of the Tongass National Forest. In October 2019, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians passed a formal resolution calling on the Forest Service to fully protect designated roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest, our country’s largest national forest. As the Federal Government seems content to ignore the concerns of tribes and the impact that widespread logging of the Tongass would have on traditional hunting and fishing grounds, Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians felt it important to reaffirm their solidarity with Alaska tribes. 

“We fully support the Organized Village of Kake and tribes of Southeast Alaska that are advocating against removal of protections for the Tongass,” said Catherine Edwards, 6th Vice President of the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. “We urge the U.S. Forest Service to listen and have meaningful consultations with tribal leaders. The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska have strongly opposed the Forest Service’s handling of the tribal consultation process with tribal villages across Southeast Alaska. They should be the ones to determine what happens to their forests since this is their ancestral lands and they’ve been there since time immemorial.” 

As the original stewards of the Pacific Northwest since time immemorial, tribes and tribal leaders need the Federal Government to work in good faith and engage in meaningful consultation with tribes to ensure that our future generations will continue to benefit from these lands. 

About Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians  

In 1953 farsighted tribal leaders in the Northwest formed the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, and dedicated it to tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Today, Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is a nonprofit organization representing over 50 Northwest tribal governments from Oregon, Idaho, Washington, southeast Alaska, Northern California, and Western Montana. Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is an organization whose foundation is composed of the people it is meant to serve — the Indian peoples. Through its conferences, forums, networks and alliances, it is the intent of Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians to represent and advocate for the interests of its member tribes to national Indian and non-Indian organizations and governments.

Support of Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indian’s Representation at the National Congress of American Indians Food Sovereignty Advance Initiative Policy Symposiums

Res #:Committee:Submitted by:Title:                                 Pass →YesNoAmended/TabledTo NCAI
2020-15Natural Resources/LandsTaylor AalvikSupport of Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indian’s Representation at the National Congress of American Indians Food Sovereignty Advance Initiative Policy Symposiums



 2020 Winter Convention 

Portland, Oregon 

RESOLUTION #2020 – 15 

“SUPPORT OF AFFILIATED TRIBES OF NORTHWEST INDIANS REPRESENTATION AT THE NATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICAN INDIANS FOOD SOVEREIGNTY ADVANCEMENT INITIATIVE POLICY SYMPOSIUMS” 

PREAMBLE 

We, the members of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians of the United States, invoking the divine blessing of the Creator upon our efforts and purposes, in order to preserve for ourselves and our descendants rights secured under Indian Treaties, Executive Orders, and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws and constitution of the United States and several states, to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian people, to preserve Indian cultural values, and otherwise to promote the welfare of the Indian people, do hereby establish and submit the following resolution: 

WHEREAS, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are representatives of and advocates for national, regional, and specific tribal concerns; and 

WHEREAS, ATNI is a regional organization comprised of American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and tribes in the states of Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Nevada, Northern California, and Alaska; and 

WHEREAS, the health, safety, welfare, education, economic and employment opportunity, and preservation of cultural and natural resources are primary goals and objectives of the ATNI; and 

WHEREAS, misguided federal policies have stripped tribal nations of land and access to healthy traditional foods; and

WHEREAS, as a result of these federal policies AI/AN face significant health disparities including higher rates of chronic diseases such as Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease compared to other populations; and 

WHEREAS, there is an urgent need for Northwest Tribes to devise strategies and policy on food sovereignty; and 

WHEREAS, food sovereignty strengthens agriculture, localizes food systems, improves economies, and improves the health and well-being of Native children, family and cultures; and 

WHEREAS, ATNI’s primary goals and objectives are focused on health safety, welfare, education, economic and employment opportunity, and preservation of cultural and natural resources; and 

WHEREAS, the ATNI Food Sovereignty Sub-Committee was formed to increase the support for dissemination of information, and policy development including protocols and laws impacting the tribal food system; and 

WHEREAS, the ATNI Food Sovereignty Sub-Committee provides an opportunity for Northwest Tribal leaders to engage in dialogue with other tribes, organizations and decision makers to share information, discuss needs and issues, strategize, and develop regional and national policy; and 

WHEREAS, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) has developed a National Food Sovereignty Advancement Initiative; and 

WHEREAS, the NCAI Food Sovereignty Advancement Initiative will hold four food sovereignty policy symposiums in the areas of agriculture, water, land, and climate action policy; and 

WHEREAS, these food sovereignty symposiums will gather information on how the federal government can alter the policies to empower food production efforts of tribal nations; and 

WHEREAS, the information gathered will be synthesized into a series of policy reports to be released by NCAI next year; and 

WHEREAS, it is imperative that Northwest Tribes provide input at these NCAI food sovereignty policy symposiums to ensure Northwest Tribal priorities are included; now 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that ATNI supports the attendance of representatives from the Food Sovereignty Sub-Committee at the NCAI Food Sovereignty Advancement Initiatives policy symposiums to communicate the needs of ATNI tribes.

CERTIFICATION 

The foregoing resolution was adopted at the 2020 Winter Convention of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, held at the DoubleTree by Hilton – Portland, Oregon, on January 27-30, 2020, with a quorum present. 

______________________________ ______________________________ 

Calling on the Washington State Governor and Legislature to Reform Water Rights for New Industrial and Commercial Users

Res #:Committee:Submitted by:Title:                                 Pass →YesNoAmended/TabledTo NCAI
2020-14Natural Resources/LandsTaylor AalvikCalling on the Washington State Governor and Legislature to Reform Water Rights for New Industrial and Commercial Users



 2020 Winter Convention 

Portland, Oregon 

RESOLUTION #2020 – 14 

“CALLING ON THE WASHINGTON STATE GOVERNOR AND LEGISLATURE TO REFORM WATER RIGHTS FOR NEW INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL USERS” 

PREAMBLE 

We, the members of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians of the United States, invoking the divine blessing of the Creator upon our efforts and purposes, in order to preserve for ourselves and our descendants rights secured under Indian Treaties, Executive Orders, and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws and constitution of the United States and several states, to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian people, to preserve Indian cultural values, and otherwise to promote the welfare of the Indian people, do hereby establish and submit the following resolution: 

WHEREAS, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are representatives of and advocates for national, regional, and specific tribal concerns; and 

WHEREAS, ATNI is a regional organization comprised of American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and tribes in the states of Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Nevada, Northern California, and Alaska; and 

WHEREAS, the health, safety, welfare, education, economic and employment opportunity, and preservation of cultural and natural resources are primary goals and objectives of the ATNI; and 

WHEREAS, 90.44 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) describes the State of Washington’s process for the management of public groundwater; and 

WHEREAS, Washington State provides for a permitting process for industrial or commercial purposes exceeding a specific use or quantity; and

WHEREAS, the State of Washington does not charge a market-rate fee to obtain public groundwater; and 

WHEREAS, the State of Washington Senate passed SB 6091 in January 2018; and 

WHEREAS, SB 6091 requires a $500 fee on wells and, in some places will limit withdrawals to an annual average of 950 gallons a day, as well as private well meters in some communities; and 

WHEREAS, although SB 6091 represents a step forward for Washington water conservation, it does not address significant water withdrawals by industrial and commercial interests; and 

WHEREAS, SB 6091 established RCW 90.44, “Streamflow Restoration,” which establishes methods for restoring streamflow in watersheds where water scarcity is a concern; and 

WHEREAS, water ‘buy-backs’ have been occurring at a rate which establishes that there is a market and a value for public water resources; and 

WHEREAS, the State of Washington does not establish a value or charge private commercial or industrial water developers a market rate for their withdrawals; now 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that ATNI does hereby call upon the Washington State Governor and the Washington State Legislature to reform water rights for new industrial and commercial water users; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that ATNI calls upon the Washington State Governor and the Washington State Legislature to value public water resources appropriately to market rates; and 

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that ATNI requests the Washington State Governor and the Washington State Legislature to cease the practice of giving away public resources to private companies while charging private citizens for water use. 

CERTIFICATION 

The foregoing resolution was adopted at the 2020 Winter Convention of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, held at the DoubleTree by Hilton – Portland, Oregon, on January 27-30, 2020, with a quorum present. 

______________________________ ______________________________ 

Supporting the Washington State Legislature to Adopt the Wildfire Prevention and Preparedness Act

Res #:Committee:Submitted by:Title:                                 Pass →YesNoAmended/TabledTo NCAI
2020-13Natural Resources/LandsTaylor AalvikSupporting the Washington State Legislature to Adopt the Wildfire Prevention and Preparedness Act



 2020 Winter Convention 

Portland, Oregon 

RESOLUTION #2020 – 13 

“SUPPORTING THE WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATURE TO ADOPT THE WILDFIRE PREVENTION AND PREPAREDNESS ACT” 

PREAMBLE 

We, the members of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians of the United States, invoking the divine blessing of the Creator upon our efforts and purposes, in order to preserve for ourselves and our descendants rights secured under Indian Treaties, Executive Orders, and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws and constitution of the United States and several states, to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian people, to preserve Indian cultural values, and otherwise to promote the welfare of the Indian people, do hereby establish and submit the following resolution: 

WHEREAS, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are representatives of and advocates for national, regional, and specific tribal concerns; and 

WHEREAS, ATNI is a regional organization comprised of American Indians/Alaska Natives and tribes in the states of Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Nevada, Northern California, and Alaska; and 

WHEREAS, the health, safety, welfare, education, economic and employment opportunity, and preservation of cultural and natural resources are primary goals and objectives of the ATNI; and 

WHEREAS, Washington State has experienced catastrophic wildfires in recent years; and 

WHEREAS, such fires have destroyed life, property, and culturally significant resources; and

WHEREAS, Washington tribal trust resources and tribal rights are threatened by increased wildfire risks associated with forest disease and climate change; and 

WHEREAS, Washington tribal leaders have expressed concerns that wildfire extent and severity is destroying trust resources and impacting air and water quality for all species; and 

WHEREAS, ATNI Tribes have actively managed forests since time immemorial which has provided the knowledge base to restore current forest health; and 

WHEREAS, the Washington State legislature has drafted legislation which may be known as the “Wildfire Prevention and Preparedness Act;” and 

WHEREAS, forest health conditions will require sustained and long-term investments in order to reverse our forest health and wildlife crisis; and 

WHEREAS, the proposed act would dedicate funding to improve the health and resiliency of Washington’s forests; now 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that ATNI supports state-wide forest health and fire protection activities on all Tribal, Federal, State, and private forests with the knowledge that these activities will be conducted in part with tribal governments and protect tribal resources from catastrophic fire loss; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that ATNI supports and encourages the Washington State Legislature to adopt a “Wildfire Prevention and Preparedness Act.” 

CERTIFICATION 

The foregoing resolution was adopted at the 2020 Winter Convention of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, held at the DoubleTree by Hilton – Portland, Oregon, on January 27-30, 2020, with a quorum present. 

______________________________ ______________________________